The Crimlin Tutorials

MAYA - Rendering

This tutorial is primarially focused on rendering. It will teach; Final gather with metal ray, DGS shaders, basic polygon modelling methods, Depth of field. You will need; Mental Ray, an HDRI map


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :

The following is a guide for setting up Global Illumination and Final Gather using Mental Ray for Maya. It is based on notes from the web, Maya’s Help manual and good-old fashion experimentation.


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :

Render a wireframe view with toonshader in maya without vector render.


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :

This is a basic modelling tutorial that will teach you how to make a screw-driver and render it with FG (Final Gather) With global illumination, HDRI (High dynamic ranged imagery) And DoF (Depth of field, optional).


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :

I will show you how to create Calm Ocean and the stormy ocean in Maya


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :

n order to fully unlock the power of the Maya renderer, you need to render your scenes in DOS. Rendering in DOS can be up to twice as fast as rendering from within Maya, depending on your processor and version of Windows.


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :

This handout will explain how to use point lights to light a scene and give it the same look as using global illumination. The overall quality is similar, it is easier to do, and best of all, it renders faster. I used a night time kitchen scene from a short film I am working on to create this handout.


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :

One of the biggest inventions in the last few years in realistic lighting solutions is the appearance of HDRI images and lighting the scenes with them. In my first tutorial on mentalray thematic, I have described the way how to use hdri images to light up the scene.


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :

Don't freak out! 'Subsurface scattering' is the term used in 3D graphics to describe the effect we see when, in the real world, light enters a surface (at least to some degree), bounces around a bit and is then either absorbed or reflected back out again. The effect is usually associated with soft/organic surfaces like skin or wax, and is a major factor in the look of those materials. How can we demostrate this effect in an obvious way?


This tutorial has been currently rated as:
Rate this Tutorial :